Professional iPhone Photography

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Hardly new news but good news all the same. Exciting imagery is no longer restricted to the photography elite. Both professional and budding photographers have been swept away by the new wave of fast photography. So with the development of phone technology and social media, anyone and everyone can enjoy successful images without burning a hole in their pockets.

Now, while I love taking shots with my DSLR, there’s something about iPhone photography that’s such fun! I think the reason for this is because we have a different relationship with our phones, which is primarily down to three things: cost, ease, and expectation.

A professional camera is defiantly an investment, one that could demand a great deal of saving, whilst your iPhone comes on a monthly tariff and the latest version of Angry Birds! No extra precautions are needed to keep everything in working order and no panic attacks if you accidently drop it down the toilet.

Capturing those fleeting moments is one of the most exciting things about photography but we don’t always have the foresight or the strength to carry a camera when out and about. So with a tap, the iPhone becomes the recorder of memories without the need to constantly be changing apertures and ISO’s.

I love the ease of editing photos on a phone.  No need for lengthy uploading or complicated Photoshop tutorials. Your camera has now become your editing software and there are numerous apps available to create professional looking images. Including Leonardo, iColorama, and Mextures.  

Lastly, it seems, a lack of expectation can produce great photography! Without the investment of too much time or money, we open ourselves up to a more relaxed way of image making. We happily hand over control to the autofocus and without too much thought; walk away something resembling an artful rendition of what we saw.  

Now, I still believe that there is skill involved with iPhone photography such as the understanding of  light, colour, form and composition, and some may argue that the phone has done all the work for you. However, I feel this new kind of image making can only enhance the way we use our more professional pieces of equipment. The combination of these two tools can allow for faster development of ideas and more risk taking as a result of our laid back attitude and a new culture of throw away photography.